Interactive IATA Dangerous goods Workshops

DGR-59 Shipper Combo

Invitation to IATA Dangerous Goods Workshop
The International Air Transport is holding two interactive 1 day workshops which will include guest speakers from across the supply chain, learn about the essentials of shipping dangerous goods and lithium batteries by air.

Target Audience
The Workshop targets all stakeholders of the air cargo supply chain. It is of particular importance to shippers, freight forwarders and airlines in the industry.

Dates and Locations
Johannesburg, South Africa – 31 January 2018 Cape Town, South Africa – 1 February 2018

Key highlights
• An overview of the current regulatory framework and what changes will come in 2018 and beyond.
• How these regulations align to the ICAO Technical Instructions, and
• Regulatory compliance of the different entities in the supply chain giving you the opportunity to learn exactly what steps you need to take to keep the supply chain safe.

Participants will receive a free electronic (windows or mobile) copy of the DGR 59th 2018 edition.

Registration & more information
Please click here to register for the Workshop.

For more information, you can write to us at: igom-africa@iata.org

DG Workshop Invite_SAF

Not quite good enough?

A recent article on http://www.insidesources.com discusses the current trend in airline fatalities.

2017 Ended Without Any Commercial Jet Crash Fatalities. Can the Streak Continue?

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The article states that Africa and Middle East have safety cultures that are “not as rigorous” as, presumably, those in Europe and the United States. Is this true or are the authors once again buying into the sentiment that exists that people think that we in Africa and the Middle East are just not quite good enough?

According to the IATA, sub-Saharan Africa still has an accident rate 44 percent higher than the global average, seems they may have a point……..

Is the problem with the “standards” or with training and application of the standards?

Is it an attitude, selection or leadership problem?

Do we have a culture problem?

Most important what are we going to do about it?