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Cargo Security Bulletin to Regulated Agents, Known Consignors, Airlines and Charter organisations

This bulletin takes the form of short highlights, PLEASE CONTACT us by e-mail if you require any FURTHER INFORMATION or EXPANSION of the information provided.

Where italics are shown this means a direct QUOTE FROM REGULATIONS, TECHNICAL STANDARDS or other CORRESPONDENCE received from the SACAA or other official bodies.

NEW PROFESSIONAL TRAINING CENTRE OPENS

We have OPENED our TRAINING CENTRE at Unit C, Wingfield Park, Geertsma Road in JET PARK

Regular scheduled TRAINING PROGRAMMES covering aviation cargo security familiarisation training take place every Tuesday and Dangerous Goods Awareness (CAT 4) every Wednesday.

The 2015 training schedule is at http://www.professionaltraining.co.za/2015-training-program.php

EUROPEAN UNION CARGO SECURITY REQUIREMENTS EFFECTIVE 1 JULY 2014.

South Africa was placed on the EU “Green List” effective 1st July 2014.

In our view, this change REDUCES the level of cargo SECURITY.

It is our STRONG ADVICE that those Regulated Agents who are REGISTERED under the EU Regulations and hold EU RA3 APPROVAL, continue to APPLY the practices applicable to the EU Regulations for two MAIN REASONS, firstly, INCREASED SECURITY and secondly, if there were an incident, and an EU accredited agent had not COMPLIED with the EU Regulations (having made a DECLARATION to do so) this could be considered a serious BREACH OF LIABILITY INSURANCE requirements.

Certain of our clients have elected to become EU REGISTERED, despite the fact that we are on the Green List, which we ENCOURAGE.

COMPREHENSIVE BACKGROUND CHECK AND CV VERIFICATION SERVICE (INCLUDING CREDIT CHECKS)

This service includes what is required under Part 110 but also provides the FULL RANGE of employee background checks including:

· DRIVERS LICENCE

· PUBLIC DRIVING PERMIT

· MATRIC CERTIFICATE AND OTHER ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS

· CRIMINAL RECORD CHECK

· ID VERIFICATION

· CITIZENSHIP AND PERMEANT RESIDENCE VERIFICATION

· PRIVATE SECURITY INDUSTRY REGULATORY AUTHORITY (PSIRA)

These services are available to be IMPLEMENTED at YOUR PREMISES, please contact us for full details

PART 109 AND 110

We report, once again, with DEEP REGRET, and fear of the security breach that this presents, that the SACAA have still NOT YET COMPLETED the amendments to PART 108, 109 AND 110. This has been raised at the Civil Aviation Regulations Committee (CARCom), on which committee we are represented through the Commercial Aviation Association of Southern Africa (CAASA), but despite pressure having been brought at CARCOM, by our representative, we still sit in LIMBO as far as these regulations are concerned.

There is a STRONG INDICATION that the Regulations may be READY for presentation at the 26TH JANUARY 2015 CARCom meeting.

We have mentioned on numerous occasions, in our bulletins and elsewhere, that the REQUIREMENTS UNDER PART 108 for cargo screeners are COMPLETELY INADEQUATE.

We cannot be more adamant when we say it is VITAL that although the requirements for certification of cargo screeners, and training, under Part 110, are NOT CURRENTLY APPLICABLE you NEVERTHELESS APPLY these requirements STRICTLY.

FREE CHECK OF YOUR SECURITY MANUALS

We repeat point 4 of Bulletin 33.

If your SECURITY MANUAL was not prepared by ourselves or under our supervision, we would be more than happy to provide you with a FREE CHECK and WRITTEN REPORT on your security manual. The fact that your manual may have been approved by the SACAA does not absolve you from ensuring that the manual is accurate, all inclusive and practical. Here again there may be INSURANCE LIABILITY implications if your MANUAL is INCOMPLETE.

FACILITATED eLEARNING TRAINING

Here again, we must state with GREAT DISAPPOINTMENT that there has been NO DISCERNIBLE PROGRESS by the SACAA to bring the eLearning system into operation. The changes to incorporate the eLearning requirements are to be contained in the Part 109 amendments (see 4 above).

SACAA SERVICE

We would like to COMPLIMENT the DIRECTOR FOR CIVIL AVIATION, MS POPPY KHOZA, for her INITIATIVE in initiating a survey of SACAA SERVICE PERFORMANCE. This survey was conducted by a team from the UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA and consisted not only of a questionnaire, which was e-mailed to various bodies, but also meetings with industry in Gauteng and Cape Town. WE ATTENDED the GAUTENG MEETING, together with REPRESENTATIVES of a number of AVIATION ORGANISATIONS, and were assured that comments, suggestions and criticism would be CONFIDENTIAL and would be CONTAINED IN A REPORT which will be released to participants. The meeting we attended lasted some hours and there was an open detailed and SIGNIFICANT DISCUSSION, particularly focused on those WEAKNESSES that had been experienced with regard to service from the SACAA.

We will keep you advised and will distribute the report with the authority of the SACAA.

LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES

We repeat what was contained in Bulletin 33.

There have been NUMEROUS INCIDENTS of SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION of lithium-ion batteries around the world and there are strong rumours that perhaps large quantities of lithium-ion batteries were TRANSPORTED ON MH370. Please find attached two articles that appeared in FTW written by SEAN REYNOLDS who is OUR AUTHORITY on LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES. We are running a number of half day LITHIUM-ION BATTERY COURSES over the next couple of months. Please contact us for further information.

Lithium Batteries
lithium battery article

We are very pleased to say that these COURSES are now available ONLINE which means that your personnel can complete this course while continuing with their operational duties.

AVAILABILITY OF THE CARGO SCREENING TEAM INCLUDING EMERGENCY CANINE SCREENING

We are AVAILABLE 24/7 through our control room telephone number 0860 PART 108 or 011 701-3320, further alternatively, through our General Manager Compliance, David Alexander at david@prisk.co.za or cell 082 308 0169.

We are AVAILABLE 24/7 throughout the HOLIDAY PERIOD.

THANKS AND GREETINGS

WE TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY OF THANKING OUR CLIENTS FOR THEIR SUPPORT AND TO WISH ALL OF YOU GOD’S BLESSINGS FOR THE FESTIVE SEASON AND THE NEW YEAR.

Kind Regards from the team at Professional.

SECURITY WITHOUT COMPROMISE WILL SAVE LIVES.

Kintetsu World Express first southern African logistics company to receive top EU safety accreditation – RA3 designation

Taking the lead, Kintetsu World Express South Africa became the first freight forwarder to be validated in accordance with the new, stringent EU security measures. The validation was conducted by an EU independent and accredited aviation security validator.

New EU security regulatory measures: 2014

Cargo security came under scrutiny when two packages containing viable explosive devices hidden in printer cartridges moved undetected through Europe in October 2010, before it was intercepted in Britain. This serious incident prompted the European Union to introduce, in addition to the ICAO Annexure 17 Regulations [covered under Part 108 of the SACAA regulations], additional measures to include air cargo or mail carriers operating in the EU from a third country airport (non EU).

In essence, this means that as from 1 July 2014, no cargo may be flown on an aircraft into the EU region without strict adherence to the new regulatory measures.

Stepping forward

Richard Szabo, director at KWE SA explains: “our business operations play a fundamental role in underpinning the success of our global footprint.”

“Our ranking as one of the top global freight forwarding companies bears testimony that we view our role as an integrated logistics supply chain company seriously. We value our role as involved business partners who deliver high quality services and it is thus tantamount that our corporate governance and EU conformance remain progressive, audited and in place” .

EU validation achievement

“Our validation underscores our impeccably high standard of service” comments Ikuhiro Hojo, director at KWE SA “particularly within the aerospace logistics industry. We were one of the first agents in South Africa to be certified against the CAA’s Part 108 security policy and this was by no means an easy feat. We continuously strive towards maintaining the highest possible standards when it comes to managing our customers’ freight.”

Independent EU aviation security validators

According to a spokesperson for Professional Cargo Security, EU aviation security validator Sander De Man; KWE SA’s first off the mark move illustrates their commitment to security and willingness to partnership with the EU, in order to achieve greater security. De Man is part of a European association of validators based in the Netherlands, Germany, France and the United Kingdom.

Continued: Kintetsu World Express receives top EU safety accreditation

He reiterated that in order to comply with the Regulations, airlines have already made written declarations of commitment to the EU. All forwarding, courier agents, airlines and consignors must become validated by an EU qualified validator accredited as such, by an EU member state.

KWE commended

David Alexander, General Manager, Compliance of Professional commended KWE SA as follows: “I am proud to be associated with Kintetsu World Express South Africa in introducing these measures and compliment them on their commitment and dedication to making our skies that much safer.”

IATA Centre of Excellence

EU independent aviation security validators have been trained through the IATA Centre of Excellence for Independent Validators; and were appointed accordingly. These accredited validators have the mandate as EU representatives to validate Airlines (validation reference ACC3), Ground Handling Agents and Forwarding Agents (validation reference RA3) and Known Consignors [validation reference KC3] as well as consignors by physical inspection of premises, records systems and procedures. Revalidation is required every 5 [five] years.

Risk assessment

There are several thousand airline cargo facilities [stations] which have to be validated before the July 2014 deadline. Non EU countries are categorized depending on risk assessment. The most secure category [in very few countries], require no further security measures except which already is in place such as the ICAO Annexure 17 measures. Intermediate risk countries must apply all the EU measures and high risk countries may not [except for exceptional circumstances], be able to export by air to EU countries at all.

Professional Cargo Security has made arrangements for another validator to spend time in South Africa within the next few weeks in order to validate forwarding and courier agents as well as Known Consignors [KC’s].

Charter operators, why risk ruin?

There is a practical and moral obligation upon all of us to do whatever needs to be done to keep the flying public, which of course includes our mothers, brothers, sisters, cousins and friends, safe from the terror and tragedy of an IED (improvised explosive device) or other cowardly act perpetrated by unhinged minds.

It is almost inconceivable that operators are not aware of cargo security requirements as set out in Annexure 17 of ICAO and Part 108 of our local regulations.

The idea is to establish a tight and secure security conduit, from consignor to aircraft, providing not only the physical security against acts of terror but also a recorded audit trail.

Alternatively (the case with charter flights) to make all cargo secure by proper screening methods.

For terror to succeed, it only takes apathy from the aviation industry

It is almost inconceivable that operators are not aware of cargo security requirements as set out in Annexure 17 of ICAO and Part 108 of our local regulations.

The idea is to establish a tight and secure security conduit, from consignor to aircraft, providing not only the physical security against acts of terror but also a recorded audit trail. Alternatively (the case with charter flights) to make all cargo secure by proper screening methods.

It is pertinent to remind operators of the definition of cargo in the regulations:

‘Cargo means any property carried on an aircraft other than mail, stores, unaccompanied or mishandled baggage’.

It should be well noted that private flights are also subject to these requirements.

Amendment 13 to ICAO Annexure 17 standard 4.6.4 (effective 15 July 2013), which insists that cargo must be confirmed and accounted for, by a Regulated Agent (in South Africa approved under Part 108) or an entity approved by an appropriate authority (SA CAA), emphasises requirements.

Complying with the Part 108 regulations is not a complicated process nor is it expensive

The threat of ruin by non-compliance is not idle speculation or unfounded rhetoric. The South African Part 108 regulations make it obligatory for Air Carriers, which include charter to make cargo known.

If there were a major incident (and perhaps we should do away with the niceties and simply say a crash involving loss of life) legal suits and legal investigation would erupt in all directions from the numerous entities that would be involved in such a situation.

It is my view, which I have reached, over the many years that I have been involved in air cargo security and the hundreds of conversations that I have had with local, international and other role players from airline personnel, regulators, insurance underwriters, lawyers (and I could go on).

Rob Garbett

Rob Garbett

That if you, as an operator, have not complied with what is required under Annexure 17 of ICAO, as contained in Part 108 of our local regulations, your business, no matter what its size, could collapse under the weight of claims made against you.

The simple principle is that if you are aware of the terrorist threat and are informed of what has been prescribed internationally as preventative measures, and choose not to adopt these measures, you will be held liable.

The ‘corporate veil’ has reached such levels of transparency that personal liability by directors and senior personnel is also a very real nightmare.

Perhaps more important than the legal or material point of view, is the moral question.

If people are killed in an air crash in horrific circumstances, you may have helped to prevent such slaughter, how would you feel?

Dangerous Goods covered under Part 92 is another area deserving concern. The application of the principals and requirements for the carriage of dangerous goods is sadly lacking in the charter industry. Loss of life is, of course the overwhelmingly most important consideration but not to be lightly dismissed is that aircraft hull and liability insurance underwriters will repudiate claims caused by illegal carriage of dangerous goods (or for that matter unknown cargo) even if the dangerous goods did not cause the incident.

It is without any shadow of doubt your responsibility to ensure that you are aware of the implications, both from a legal and moral point of view, of non-compliance with both the Cargo Security and Dangerous Goods regulations.

Article by Rob Garbett, Honorary Director for Life of the Commercial Aviation Association of Southern Africa and Managing Director of Professional Aviation Services (Pty) Ltd.

Article previously published in the CAASA newsletter of May 2013

Cargo Security Bulletin to Regulated Agents, Known Consignors and Charter organisations

This bulletin takes the form of short highlights, PLEASE CONTACT us by e-mail if you require any FURTHER INFORMATION or EXPANSION of the information given.

1 FAMILIARISATION TRAINING – GOOD NEWS !!

We have just completed an ELECTRONIC TRAINING COURSE which is now available. This means YOUR STAFF will be able to complete their FAMILIARISATION TRAINING ONLINE. We are also in the process of DEVELOPING ONLINE TRAINING covering DANGEROUS GOODS and OTHER COURSES which will be available from mid JANUARY 2013. LOANER LAPTOPS, in a limited quantity, are also AVAILABLE.

VISIT OUR TRAINING PORTAL TODAY!

2 NEW REGULATIONS

Part 92, 108, 109, 110 and 111 Regulations came into full EFFECT from 1ST AUGUST 2012. Please note that the SACAA PROPOSED, which proposal was accepted by an industry / SACAA sub committee, that PART 110 AND 109 TECHNICAL STANDARDS SHOULD BE KEPT RESTRICTED.

Bob Garbett, who serves on the sub committee, and on CARcom, was ADAMANTLY AGAINST this proposal for all the OBVIOUS REASONS, however, certain members of industry and the SACAA SUPPORTED THE PROPOSAL. The proposal was then submitted to CARcom (the Civil Aviation Regulations Committee) at which it was PROPOSED that Part 108 TECHNICAL STANDARDS should also be RESTRICTED. This too was carried against OBJECTIONS from the COMMERCIAL AVIATION ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHERN AFRICA (on which body Bob Garbett is an honorary Director for Life). CAASA has NOT DROPPED THIS MATTER and APPEALED the decision by CARcom. Frankly, this is a RIDICULOUS SITUATION, which option we have voiced STRONGLY at CARcom, through CAASA, as any amendments, for example to these Technical Standards would also have to be applied for creating an unnecessary burden of administration for all.

In the meantime, if you do not have COPIES OF THESE TECHNICAL STANDARDS (and most Regulated Agents and airlines, ironically, all already have copies) you need to make APPLICATION to the CAA. We suggest (if you REQUIRE the TECHNICAL STANDARDS) that you address a LETTER to the SACAA requesting copies of the Part 110, 109 and 108 Technical Standards and SEND the letter to OURSELVES. WE will then APPROACH THE SACAA with batches of letters and ensure that authority for your holding a copy of the Technical Standards is obtained as soon as possible. The letter should STATE WHETHER or not you ALREADY HOLD a current set of these Technical Standards.

It was DIRECTED by CARcom at the 28th November meeting, as a result of the CAASA appeal, that this decision must be REVIEWED at the next sub committee meeting to be held in JANUARY.

3 Part 109 and Part 110

The SACAA have as yet still not completed the proposed AMENDMENTS to these Regulations which will incorporate all TRAINING including training required under Part 108 (currently regulated under Part 141) into Part 109. We hope this will be CONCLUDED by the SECOND QUARTER of NEXT YEAR. We are also advised that Aviation Information Circular AIC 18-49, which eliminates certain requirements for cargo screeners under Part 110, will be withdrawn. In the meantime, it is of MAJOR IMPORTANCE that cargo screeners COMPLY with the PROVISIONS of Part 110 which are LISTED BELOW (previously listed in Bulletin 24, April 2011, and Bulletin 19, May 2010).

a) SECURITY GRADING in terms of the Security Act no. 56 2001.

b) The security graded screener must be EMPLOYED BY A SECURITY SERVICE PROVIDER.

c) The screener must have at least DANGEROUS GOODS CAT 12.

d) The screener must have STANDARD AIR CARGO SECURITY TRAINING LEVEL 1.

e) Category 1: SECURITY SCREENER TRAINING

f) The screener must have completed AWARENESS TRAINING in terms of Part 109 (if he works at an airport) and or, if he works at an off airport Regulated Agent, FAMILIARISATION TRAINING in terms of Part 108.

g) The screener must have a CLASS II MEDICAL CERTIFICATE.

h) 40 HOURS CLASSROOM training, 40 HOURS PRACTICAL TRAINING.

i) COMPREHENSIVE BACKGROUND CHECK as set out in Part 110.

4 Designated officials, deputies and their employer to be registered with PSIRA.

Please find attached a LETTER from PSIRA dated 13th September 2012 addressed to the SACAA which was CIRCULATED by the SACAA recently. It is of SIGNIFICANT IMPORTANCE that you note that DESIGNATED OFFICIALS, their DEPUTIES and their EMPLOYERS (if you are employing persons in these positions) must be REGISTERED WITH PSIRA.

In our view, it MAKES SENSE from every point of view that INSTEAD OF EMPLOYING your own Designated Official and Deputy, these are PROVIDED BY A SERVICE PROVIDER.

5 Please refer to point 5 of Bulletin no. 29 of 20th June 2012 under “MEETING WITH DIRECTOR AND SENIOR STAFF OF AVSEC”. REPORT BACK

5.1 AIC 18-49, as mentioned above, will be WITHDRAWN.

5.2 Part 108, Part 109 Awareness Training has NOT IMPROVED.

5.3 GRADING OF DESIGNATED OFFICIALS, this has now been FINALISED, see above.

5.4 We stress that HAND SEARCH should be AVOIDED in all circumstances due to LIABILITY IMPLICATIONS.

5.5 The Part 110 and 109 AMENDMENTS have still NOT been COMPLETED.

5.6 KNOWN CONSIGNORS is still at an unacceptably LOW LEVEL.

5.7 MATURING has now been REMOVED as a security control.

Kind regards from the team at Professional Risk.

SECURITY WITHOUT COMPROMISE WILL SAVE LIVES.

The space between vigilance and paranoia

The security of air cargo has lagged behind stringent baggage and passenger security, a massive flaw in the armour of airline security.

80 % of air cargo worldwide lands up on passenger aircraft.

The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) has devised, in consultation with air carriers, forwarding and security organisations and governments, a system of checks, balances, procedures and requirements summarised together in Annexure 17 to the Chicago convention on International Civil Aviation (safeguarding International Civil Aviation against acts of unlawful interference) which is the mechanism devised to enhance air cargo security.

In South Africa the Regulations required to comply with ICAO Annexure 17 have been incorporated into the Civil Aviation Regulations of 1997 under Part 108 of the Regulations by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA).

The essence of the Regulations is that cargo from a known, and validated, source (consignors) passing through known and validated agents, and certified as such, may be accepted by air carriers as Known Cargo which then requires no further security, apart from random checks. If cargo does not qualify as Known Cargo delays, and the formidable risk of rejection of liability claims in the event of an incident, will be the consequence.

The SACAA Technical Standards, together with the Regulations, forms the foundation upon which the security procedures, measures and training may be formulated and introduced.

The technologies that have been implemented covering the carrying of weapons and other dangerous articles in passenger’s carry on baggage is meaningful and a forceful deterrent against the introduction of explosive and dangerous articles. However, this technology is questionable when applied to air cargo which consists of thousands of different shapes, sizes and differing materials often combining these materials.

It is indisputable that there is no single, technical or other practical, security control applied to air cargo that is infallible and that will not be able to be bypassed by a determined terrorist. ICAO have therefore devised this integrated system that involves all the segments of the supply conduit line from the consignor, or sender, through the hands of the forwarding or courier agent, the air carrier or handling agent, ramp handling agent and those responsible for loading the aircraft. In this way every entity becomes an active participant in air cargo security not only creating a secure conduit but also creating an audit trail which, in itself, is a tactic of deterrence.

Personnel employed at, and along, all stages of the conduit, must all undergo Air Cargo Security Familiarisation Training (and in certain specific cases formal training) as well as background checks including criminal checks. The premises of each of the control entities in the chain must be audited and made secure. Procedures set out in Air Cargo Security manuals, approved by the Civil Aviation Authority, dictate operational procedures.

Cargo having passed through the process becomes Known Cargo.

If Unknown Cargo is presented to a forwarding, courier agent or air carrier it must be made known by applying one, or more, of the security controls that are recommended in the Part 108 Technical Standards.

It is vital, and indeed a moral obligation that all parties involved in the movement of cargo must apply on-going vigilance and co-operation from consignor to aircraft.

Aviation safety is an absolute. It is not the quest for zero defect. It IS zero defect (with acknowledgement to Professor Johann Coetzee). This must be the standard that is applied at all times. Compromise or complacency must not be tolerated. The lives of innocent people could well depend on the quality of participation of all those that are involved in the movement of air cargo.

The Lockerbie disaster required an explosive device the size of a man’s fist to tragically affect the lives of hundreds of people. Binary explosives are the combination of two inert chemicals which, when combined even in small quantities, cause a powerful explosion using a low temperature detonator, these are unlikely to be detected by technical means.

It is almost a foregone conclusion that unless there is on-going and active stimulation of Part 108 measures, this potential complacency will set in. This will be balanced by the forwarding, or courier, agents having to appoint specifically trained Designated Officials who are responsible to the Civil Aviation Authority to ensure that the measures are implemented and are on-going. These Designated Officials are also responsible to ensure that the senders of cargo (consignors) implement and continue to apply the Part 108 security measures. The Civil Aviation Inspectorate, formed for this specific purpose, will also play a major role in the on-going vigilance required.

Liability insurance underwriters will certainly take a dim view of non compliance with these measures, which create a real possibility of claims being repudiated, and we should all be aware that claims involving passenger aircraft may well run to hundreds of millions of USD.

The silver lining is that these measures will increase general logistics security and help to deter fraud.

Article by Rob Garbett, Managing Director of Professional Aviation Services.

Aviation Security and Dangerous Goods training program for November and December 2012

Professional is pleased to announce our aviation security and dangerous goods training program for November and December 2012:

1. Standard Air Cargo Security Training Level 1

This 5 day course for air cargo security screeners will be offered from 5th to 9th November 2012  and 3rd to 7th December 2012 at our training centre at Transit Park, 27 Pomona Road, Pomona. The starting time for the course will be 07h30 for 08h00 daily. All course material, refreshments and lunches included.

Please note that bookings close on Wednesday the 31 October for the November course and on Wednesday 28th November for the December course, submit your booking forms now to avoid disappointment.

2. Standard Air Cargo Security Level 2          

The 5 day course for Supervisors and Managers will be offered from 19th to 23rd November 2012 and 10th to 14th December 2012 at our training centre at Transit Park, 27 Pomona Road, Pomona. The starting time for the course will be 07h30 for 08h00 daily. All course material, refreshments and lunches included.

Please note that bookings close on Wednesday the 14 November and on Wednesday 5th December for the December course, submit your booking forms now to avoid disappointment.

3. Air Cargo Security Familiarisation Training 

This is the basic foundation air cargo security course and it is mandatory for all persons who are employed in the air cargo warehouse, all who deal with air cargo or air cargo documentation and for any person who enjoys unescorted access to the air cargo warehouse.

This full day course will be offered every week day in November 2012 and every week day to 14th December 2012 at our training centre at Transit Park, 27 Pomona Road, Pomona. The starting time for the course will be 07h30 for 08h00 daily. All course material, refreshments and lunches included.

Please note that bookings close 5 working days prior to each course so submit your booking forms now to avoid disappointment.

4. Dangerous Goods (CAT 4) 

We will offer the full day Dangerous Goods awareness course in Category 4 on 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 November 2012 at our training centre at Transit Park, 27 Pomona Road, Pomona. The starting time for the course will be 07h30 for 08h00 daily. All course material, refreshments and lunches included.

Please note that bookings close 5 working days prior to each course so submit your booking forms now to avoid disappointment.

In House Course

To assist with your operations and planning, Professional offers all courses on an in-house training basis subject to minimum class sizes and/or rates. A surcharge may apply for weekend training.

Contact David on david@prisk.co.za, Sean on sean@prisk.co.za, Brett on brett@prisk.co.za or Elliot on elliot@prisk.co.za for further details.

Thanks,

The Professional Team

See the dinosaur eggs at AAD 2012!

When people discuss the origins of flight, they tend to concentrate on birds, on which man based the early studies that finally led to the first flying aeroplanes.

But it has been concluded by the scientific world that these feathered creatures, today represented by 9 900 living species, in turn evolved from small, specialised coelurosaurian theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic period (from about 196-to-45 million years ago). Among the features linking theropod dinosaurs to birds are the three-toed foot, a furcula (wishbone), air-filled bones, brooding of the eggs, and (in some cases) feathers.

And Professional Aviation Services have organised an exclusive display at the Africa Aerospace & Defence 2012 air show (September 19-23) to show this connection.

Part of this shows a clutch of fossilised dinosaur eggs laid by the herbivore dinosaur, Massospondylus carinatus, in the early Jurassic period, and found near the Golden Gate National Park in the North Eastern Free State. Two of these had been carefully opened by experts in Canada to show the fossilised skeletal remains of the dinosaur young.

To further emphasise the connection between dinosaurs and birds, Professional is also displaying an imprint of a small dinosaur clearly showing that it was feathered – presented to the University of the Witwatersrand by the Peoples Republic of China.

The MD of Professional Aviation, Bob Garbett, has borrowed the exhibits from the Bernard Price Institute for Palaeontlogical Research at Wits University – and, due to their priceless nature, the eggs will be displayed in a bullet-proof alarmed glass case under 24-hour guard.

After the display they will be exhibited as part of the Wits 90 Treasures Exhibition at Wits University.

This article appeared previously in the FTW.

High Security Cargo Systems

The security of your cargo is off critical importance, not only to minimize loss and shrinkage but to ensure that the very best preventative measures are in place to prevent the introduction of illegal, dangerous and prohibited items into your cargo.

Professional Risk has the answer, the ProSecure suite of security products for cargo.

The ProSecure suite consists of the following:

  • A Pallet Sock that covers the cargo and seals the pallet sock to the pallet to prevent the introduction of contraband or illegal items and prevents theft and stock losses;

SANYO DIGITAL CAMERA

  • An WIST RFID tracker that enables real time tracking of your consignment, alerts you to tampering with your cargo and puts you in control of the security of your consignment at all times;

  • A high security steel mesh lined Pallet Sock is available that makes the Pallet Sock cut and slash resistant ideal for high value cargo such as cell phones, laptops, cosmetics;

Would you like your cell phones packed like this use ProSecure!!!

 

  • The Pallet Sock is accepted by the South African Civil Aviation Authority as Tamper Evident packaging under the Part 108 regulations relating to air cargo security.

The impact of this on your security packaging cost can be significant for consolidations and     consignments with a common destination only ONE Pallet Sock, Known Cargo label and seal would be required instead of a label and seal for each box on a pallet.

For full product features and specifications:

The ProSecure Difference

Professional Risk and asset Management are air cargo security specialists with a focus on all aspects of the security of your cargo and systems, compliance with Part 108 of the South African Civil Aviation Regulations.

We invite you to view our presentation for details on compliance with Part 108.

In addition Professional Risk is a South African Civil Aviation Authority accredited Training Institution for all security and Dangerous Goods training.

We are also a TETA (Transport Education Training Authority) Service Provider (TETA 11-175).

Full details from our WEBSITE

The Pallet Sock Company ProSecure cargo security solution

The Professional team is excited to announce several powerful new security solutions designed to add value to your business, secure your cargo and improve your security systems including an improved turn around time for the screening of your cargo.

Introducing all-new ProSecure Suite

Our brand-new integrated ProSecure suite of cargo security systems and products from The Pallet Sock Company will help you streamline your company’s security systems and take your security operations to the next level.

Keep track of your company’s high value cargo, prevent tampering and cargo losses with our unified security solutions.

The Pallet Sock Company ProSecure solution is for you, we have a number of unique, professional and cost effective products within the ProSecure line, depending on your cargo volume we will custom design the ideal solution for your business.

Do you prefer the coalface?

The importance of risk management is, unfortunately, best understood only when disaster strikes.

Freight industry management executives were inevitably born, and raised, at the coalface of the business.  The art of management, including risk management, is more often than not learnt late in the career of a freight management executive.   The entrenchment of coalface experience, which often means fighting fires on a day to day basis rather than constructive forward planning, is difficult to shake off.   This mind set is encouraged by the attitude that “it will never happen to me”.

There are a number of examples of failure to manage risk striking down the freight powerful simply because the “through the ranks” freight executives did not master this essential slice of the management pie.

Vulnerabilities in this area fall into a number of categories, I will concentrate, as this is my area of experience, on the risk management required in respect of the security of air cargo.

It is known, and accepted, that aircraft are vulnerable to terrorist attacks, I need only mention the word Yemeni and everybody knows exactly what I am talking about.  ICAO introduced, many years ago, measures which have been refined and improved over the years, to minimise the dangers of terrorist attack on aircraft introduced through cargo.

The success of these measures is dependent on the co-operation of the components that make up the integrated process from consignor to aircraft.   Like it or not, if a freight, or courier agent, and to a lesser extent perhaps consignor, is not actively participating the risk management of air cargo, it displays a laissez faire attitude, inter alia, to the stakeholders of the enterprise.  Shareholders are protected by the layers of law that separate them from the business, not so directors.   Half-cocked risk management of air cargo could involve the directors in personal liability.

The freight forwarder, courier agent or air carrier, who choose not to participate in the legal requirements of air cargo risk management, being Annexure 17 of ICAO and Part 108, 109 and 110 of the SACAA regulations, are in the front line of the legal liability firing squad should an incident occur involving an explosive device. This vulnerability of does not derive solely from terrorist threats, dangerous goods are an equal part of the risk management that must be applied.   Incredible as it may seem, many forwarding agents, courier agents and air carriers are not aware of the legal requirement that even if you do not handle dangerous goods your staff require, by law, certain elements of dangerous goods training.  This does not mean one or two persons in the warehouse, it means everybody in the warehouse.   This example of ignorance in the industry is a tailor made illustration of the point that risk management is very low on the scale of perceived, or practised management responsibilities.

It is said by cynics that we live in a cold, harsh business world governed by the quest for money in which truth, honesty and integrity take a back seat.  In this environment, moral obligations that the freight industry owe to society is often blurred, or even lost.  The aircraft that carries your cargo also carries sisters, brothers, wives, sons, daughters, and friends who are dependent on your integrity, your skill and your application of the principles to protect these persons from injury and death.    If you do not do your job by disregarding your moral and legal responsibilities, you could have the deaths of many many people resting upon your conscience until you too meet with the end of this life that we all face.

Post by Rob Garbett Managing Director of Professional Aviation Services (Pty) Ltd. this article was previously published in FTW