IATA Publications Sales Agent

Looking for IATA publications? We are an authorised IATA Publications Reseller

We are an officially recognised IATA Publications Reseller.

If you are looking for any IATA publication, from the latest IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations, to Cargo codes; contact us today with your requirements.  Have a look at our PAS IATA Publications Catalogue 2016 and contact us in order to place your order.

IATA Publications Sales Agent

Lithium Batteries: are they safe?

A discussion on the safety of transporting lithium batteries


by: David Alexander, General Manager, ICAO AVSEC PM

The transport by air of lithium batteries has been in the news lately, from air carriers banning the transport of “hover boards” to the latest news that the FAA is lobbying ICAO for a total ban on the transport of lithium batteries on passenger aircraft.

But why the fuss?

Lithium Battery Fire Damage

UPS Plane destroyed by lithium ion battery fire

Imagine that you are on an aircraft at 36 000 ft and a lithium battery fire breaks out in the hold, a fire that cannot be extinguished by any current aircraft fire suppression system, a fire that provides its own oxygen, a fire that burns at 2 000 c and will continue to burn until it consumes all combustible material including the aircraft and…..you.

Far-fetched? No. unlikely? Possibly but we are not in the business of taking chances with people’s lives.

 

All that being said lithium batteries are perfectly safe to carry provided that they have been UN certified as safe for transport, have been manufactured by a reputable supplier, have been packed according to IATA standards and have not been mishandled. Batteries contained in equipment (cell phones for example) or packed with equipment (your new laptop) are perfectly safe.

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A lot has been happening on the safety front, this from The Loadstar.co.uk:

The US National Transportation Safety Board issued two recommendations this week to the Department of Transport. It recommended that lithium batteries be physically separated from other flammable hazardous materials stowed on aircraft, and also to set maximum loading density requirements, which would limit the quantities of lithium batteries and flammable hazardous materials on board.

 

Continue reading

We have moved ….

Our training facilities and operations centre in Wingfield Park have moved from Unit C to Unit F.

We are in the process of setting up a new and improved training centre that will cater for more classes.

We are certified to present the following courses:

  • Part 108 – Air Cargo Security Awareness Training, Level 1 and Level 2
  • Part 92 – Dangerous Goods Awareness – CAT 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10 & 12
  • Part 109 – Aviation Security Awareness Training

We also present the following courses:

  • Guidelines on shipping Lithium Batteries
  • Human factors for Personnel
  • Human factors for Supervisors &  Managers

Keep an eye out for our January training schedule.

You can contact us for your training needs in South Africa by completing the contact form found on this site or by visiting http://www.professionaltraining.co.za.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Aviation Security and Dangerous Goods training program for November and December 2012

Professional is pleased to announce our aviation security and dangerous goods training program for November and December 2012:

1. Standard Air Cargo Security Training Level 1

This 5 day course for air cargo security screeners will be offered from 5th to 9th November 2012  and 3rd to 7th December 2012 at our training centre at Transit Park, 27 Pomona Road, Pomona. The starting time for the course will be 07h30 for 08h00 daily. All course material, refreshments and lunches included.

Please note that bookings close on Wednesday the 31 October for the November course and on Wednesday 28th November for the December course, submit your booking forms now to avoid disappointment.

2. Standard Air Cargo Security Level 2          

The 5 day course for Supervisors and Managers will be offered from 19th to 23rd November 2012 and 10th to 14th December 2012 at our training centre at Transit Park, 27 Pomona Road, Pomona. The starting time for the course will be 07h30 for 08h00 daily. All course material, refreshments and lunches included.

Please note that bookings close on Wednesday the 14 November and on Wednesday 5th December for the December course, submit your booking forms now to avoid disappointment.

3. Air Cargo Security Familiarisation Training 

This is the basic foundation air cargo security course and it is mandatory for all persons who are employed in the air cargo warehouse, all who deal with air cargo or air cargo documentation and for any person who enjoys unescorted access to the air cargo warehouse.

This full day course will be offered every week day in November 2012 and every week day to 14th December 2012 at our training centre at Transit Park, 27 Pomona Road, Pomona. The starting time for the course will be 07h30 for 08h00 daily. All course material, refreshments and lunches included.

Please note that bookings close 5 working days prior to each course so submit your booking forms now to avoid disappointment.

4. Dangerous Goods (CAT 4) 

We will offer the full day Dangerous Goods awareness course in Category 4 on 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 November 2012 at our training centre at Transit Park, 27 Pomona Road, Pomona. The starting time for the course will be 07h30 for 08h00 daily. All course material, refreshments and lunches included.

Please note that bookings close 5 working days prior to each course so submit your booking forms now to avoid disappointment.

In House Course

To assist with your operations and planning, Professional offers all courses on an in-house training basis subject to minimum class sizes and/or rates. A surcharge may apply for weekend training.

Contact David on david@prisk.co.za, Sean on sean@prisk.co.za, Brett on brett@prisk.co.za or Elliot on elliot@prisk.co.za for further details.

Thanks,

The Professional Team

Do you prefer the coalface?

The importance of risk management is, unfortunately, best understood only when disaster strikes.

Freight industry management executives were inevitably born, and raised, at the coalface of the business.  The art of management, including risk management, is more often than not learnt late in the career of a freight management executive.   The entrenchment of coalface experience, which often means fighting fires on a day to day basis rather than constructive forward planning, is difficult to shake off.   This mind set is encouraged by the attitude that “it will never happen to me”.

There are a number of examples of failure to manage risk striking down the freight powerful simply because the “through the ranks” freight executives did not master this essential slice of the management pie.

Vulnerabilities in this area fall into a number of categories, I will concentrate, as this is my area of experience, on the risk management required in respect of the security of air cargo.

It is known, and accepted, that aircraft are vulnerable to terrorist attacks, I need only mention the word Yemeni and everybody knows exactly what I am talking about.  ICAO introduced, many years ago, measures which have been refined and improved over the years, to minimise the dangers of terrorist attack on aircraft introduced through cargo.

The success of these measures is dependent on the co-operation of the components that make up the integrated process from consignor to aircraft.   Like it or not, if a freight, or courier agent, and to a lesser extent perhaps consignor, is not actively participating the risk management of air cargo, it displays a laissez faire attitude, inter alia, to the stakeholders of the enterprise.  Shareholders are protected by the layers of law that separate them from the business, not so directors.   Half-cocked risk management of air cargo could involve the directors in personal liability.

The freight forwarder, courier agent or air carrier, who choose not to participate in the legal requirements of air cargo risk management, being Annexure 17 of ICAO and Part 108, 109 and 110 of the SACAA regulations, are in the front line of the legal liability firing squad should an incident occur involving an explosive device. This vulnerability of does not derive solely from terrorist threats, dangerous goods are an equal part of the risk management that must be applied.   Incredible as it may seem, many forwarding agents, courier agents and air carriers are not aware of the legal requirement that even if you do not handle dangerous goods your staff require, by law, certain elements of dangerous goods training.  This does not mean one or two persons in the warehouse, it means everybody in the warehouse.   This example of ignorance in the industry is a tailor made illustration of the point that risk management is very low on the scale of perceived, or practised management responsibilities.

It is said by cynics that we live in a cold, harsh business world governed by the quest for money in which truth, honesty and integrity take a back seat.  In this environment, moral obligations that the freight industry owe to society is often blurred, or even lost.  The aircraft that carries your cargo also carries sisters, brothers, wives, sons, daughters, and friends who are dependent on your integrity, your skill and your application of the principles to protect these persons from injury and death.    If you do not do your job by disregarding your moral and legal responsibilities, you could have the deaths of many many people resting upon your conscience until you too meet with the end of this life that we all face.

Post by Rob Garbett Managing Director of Professional Aviation Services (Pty) Ltd. this article was previously published in FTW